3MT402: USING DIGITAL STORYTELLING TO IMPROVE ENGLISH SPEAKING SKILLS AND CREATIVE THINKING AMONGST SECONDARY SCHOOL PUPILS

GEOFFREY LIM FU CHIEN Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

VIC24 | Virtual 3MT

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In the global landscape of English language learning, the pedagogical approach has evolved beyond traditional methods, emphasising the importance of practical application and experiential learning. In the context of modern education, there is a persistent problem where students in secondary schools frequently demonstrate a deficiency in both English language ability and creative thinking. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the effectiveness of using digital storytelling (DST) as a pedagogical tool to enhance English speaking skills and foster creative thinking. Employing a quantitative approach, questionnaires were administered to 80 purposively sampled secondary school pupils. The findings were complemented by video analysis of 16 selected recordings for triangulation. The quantitative data were analysed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), revealing that DST has a significant impact on improving English speaking skills and encouraging creative thinking among secondary school pupils. The SPSS result for both speaking skills and creative thinking produced a p-value of 0.000, suggesting statistical significance at the level of 0.05. The implications of these findings underscore incorporating innovative digital tools like DST into ESL instruction in Malaysia aligns with international language education frameworks and national education goals, supporting quality education and equipping students with essential linguistic and critical thinking skills for success in a globalized, technology-driven society. Future research should explore the broader impacts of DST on language abilities, such as interpreting spoken language and writing proficiency, as well as investigate its effects on cognitive skills like critical thinking and metacognition among secondary school pupils.